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20110731
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
&p said they need to do to keep the credit rating at triple-a. >> how big of a concern is that? even with the plans the credit rating might still be downgraded? >> it's a very big risk, anderson. there's two different events here and it's hard to keep them separated from each other. the first is getting the debt sealing lifted. that's the critical negotiation under way now. even if we get it lifted, eric's right. standard & poor's is saying even if you get it lifted it's how much you're willing to cut the deficits that they will really judge the triple-a rating of the united states on and if it's something less than $3 to $4 trillion in real cuts they're going to lower the credit rating of the united states for the first time in our history. we've had it since 1917 we've been triple-a. there's a growing sense at top levels here in washington that the chances of a credit rating downgrade is becoming more than just a possibility but moving towards a probability. >> april, for those who haven't been following this as closely as everybody in washington and a lot of other folks have been
the big names on the left and the right from paul crewingman to alan greenspan to the chamber of commerce all say missing the deadline would be suicidal. yet both sides have been playing chicken on the issue for months. tonight house minority leader erik cantor against making any revenue increases as part of a debt deal said he might be willing to talk about closing some tax loopholes. he the rest of the gop leadership and their democratic counterparts on call to meet with president obama tomorrow at the white house. some breaking news there, the "washington post" just now moving a story reporting on a possible big concession the president might put on the table. the post reporting he will for the first time offer up significant savings in social security. the newspaper sourcing it to people in both parties with knowledge of the president's proposal. in any case, today mr. obama called on both sides to get moving. >> congress has a responsibility to make sure we pay our bills. we've always paid them in the past. the notion that u.s. is going to default on its debt is just irresponsible. a
found this really interesting. many people say that suggests these online pharmacist could be a big factor in the prescription drug problem overall. for one second i want to show you some numbers as to how big a number we're talking about here. . according to the national institute on drug abuse about 7 million people using prescription drugs for non-medical reason. in 2009 ant 3% of the population. nearly one in 12 high school seniors report non-medical use of vicodin. one in 20 say they used oxycontin. what's interesting, drew, is that 59% of those high school seniors also say they got the drugs from a friend or a relative. which brings up another question. as you've been pointing out in your reports, it's so easy to buy these drugs online. but if the pharmacies start to shut down, can people get term from their family or friends pretty easily? >> they certainly will. but i think it's the proliferation of the ease of getting these drugs. and even people who want these drugs, let's say a doctor predescribes them. but the prescription runs out. they're addicted. they want to keep it
small number of republicans who think that we won't default and if we did it's not a big problem. they're wrong. you also have a big number of democrats and much larger number who say it doesn't matter if we spend the nation into bankruptcy. we won't go bankrupt. they're wrong. and that's even worse because there are more of them who believe that than the small number of republicans who are willing to countenance the fall. >> let me ask you something. >> let me be clear. these polls, can i just be clear about something? this is washington equivalent. polls are not equivalent. the public blames the congressional republicans much more than the president, all right? that's a fact that cannot be disputed. we should not get off with the facts are. it's not a pox on both the house. it's overwhelmingly the public blames the congressional republicans. >> james, as somebody who's made his living with polls you know as well as i do that there's not only one poll in town. there's a bunch of them. >> three of them. you can look at all three. [ overlapping speakers ] >> his numbers have been droppi
amendment? >> well, this has become a very big subject in the law professor world. the 14th amendment is one of the most familiar parts of the constitution, guarantees due process of law, equal protection of the law. but there is frankly a provision in section 4 that i have never paid any attention to before. and it goes like this. section 4 of the 14th amendment said "the validity of the public debt of the united states shall not be questioned". now, i don't know exactly what that means. i don't think anybody knows precisely what that means. but it has been suggested that under that provision, president obama could simply order that the debt be paid and that this crisis be forestalled. he has mostly reject that option, but as far as i've read their statements, they have not completely rejected that option. obama has always said, look, i think this should be dealt with by congress, not by unilaterally under the 14th amendment. but under my reading of their statements, they haven't completely ruled out in a total crisis situation invoking the section of the amendment and ordering the debt pai
or will this cause some bigger conversation? that's a big question. >> and earlier in the week, anderson, we were talking about whether the white house might possibly agree to some kind of a short-term patch of two to three days in order to get the negotiations really moving again. and i think, you know, as the clock ticks i think we have to look back to that scenario and wonder whether that's a possibility again. >> remember all that grand bargain big talk? doesn't that seem like 20 years ago? was that like two weeks ago? >> yeah. although if you talk to some democrats and jessica's been reporting that the white house is still talking about some kind of a grand bargain, right? so it seems like a long time ago. but funny how these things work, right? >> john, gloria thank you. i want to bring in two other perspectives now. on the left democratic strategyist cornell -- and former senate candidate mccain advisor and former hue let pack yard ceo, carly fiorina. carly, just in terms of the politics of, this how do you think republicans are looking at this in terms of the political who's going to get
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)